At the Homestead: First Fire in the Hearth

It’s been a big day around here! We still don’t know if we will be able to stay in the house all winter, but we are a giant leap closer today.

Jonathan spent several hours building the chimney and prepping the wood burning stove for its first fire!

And our devoted apprentice, Margie, was out in the cold with me stapling up a wind and rain barrier to help seal up the house and get it ready for some insulation.



So at 8pm tonight, our 8 year old Maggie lit the fire for the first time and we have a warm hearth! We are so thankful. And truly lucky to even be here living this life.


And so…hauling firewood begins!


A Supply Run to Standing Rock

The girls and I had the great privilege of delivering some much needed winter supplies this weekend to the thousands of people in North Dakota protecting the water from the proposed oil pipeline.
 

Much of our time there this weekend felt too sacred to document with photos…Sharing food and gratitude around the fire, helping at the camp kitchens with dishes, meeting many new friends from all over the planet who are doing this brave and necessary work.
 

 

It was deeply moving to see so many indigenous people from not only Turtle Island but all over the world now, come together in this way. The beautiful flags line the entrance to camp and the energy is hard to describe in words. Over 260 Nations are represented (with more arriving every day), the largest of any such gathering since Wounded Knee in 1973.

I will say that the supplies we brought…lumber, firewood, a wood burning stove, and much more…were met with full gratitude, and sometimes even baffled amazement at the support pouring in from many directions.

My girls had many questions. “Why are all the United States flags upside down?” “Why doesn’t the government just tell the oil company they can’t do that?” “Why are some people so greedy? Don’t they see that they are hurting people?” I did my best to answer but there were some hard questions.

Contrary to some news floating around on FB, construction has not stopped as Obama “requested” within the 20 mile area on either side of the Missouri River and the sacred sites. There is a commitment to peaceful but direct action every day at the sites. And there are several lawsuits pending against Dakota Access for their avoidance of following legal protocol with permits and construction, so any donations to the legal fund and the camp are hugely appreciated.

If you feel called to go, do it. Your presence and support would be most welcome. Go with a humble heart, show up in service and with an ear ready to listen.

This is not just about water. This is about choosing care for the planet and the people over greed and power.

This is history in the making, and most news sources aren’t even mentioning it.

When we stopped at the gas station before driving home, the headline on the local paper was something about the construction deadline being delayed because the native folks are causing trouble. And the extra cost that would be for the company. Wow.

So please continue sharing and spreading the word.

It’s long overdue that the Earth and the indigenous people of this planet are treated with the respect they deserve.

What kind of world do we want our children and grandchildren to inherit?

Nests revealed

With the leaves all fallen now, all sorts of abandoned nests are being revealed on the land. Any guesses what type of birds made these four?? I have a few ideas, but don’t know for sure. Here are some hints…

TOP LEFT: Found in a small tree in a marshy area, 2 feet off the ground.
TOP RIGHT: Found right outside the bus, in a stand of wild plum trees, 4 feet off the ground.
BOTTOM LEFT: Found in a large red cedar tree, right outside the chicken coop, 5 feet off the ground.
BOTTOM RIGHT: Found in a wild plum tree up on the ridge, 4 feet off the ground.

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